What is the best description of supervised learning?

Supervised learning is a type of machine learning where the algorithm learns from labeled data. It's like having a teacher by your side, guiding you through every step of the learning process. The teacher, in this case, is the data, and the student is the algorithm. The teacher provides feedback on every mistake, helping the student improve its performance. With supervised learning, the algorithm can make accurate predictions on new, unseen data. This makes it ideal for tasks like image and speech recognition, where the input data is often complex and difficult to analyze.

Quick Answer:
Supervised learning is a type of machine learning where an algorithm learns from labeled data, which means that the data is provided with correct answers or outputs. The algorithm's goal is to learn the relationship between the input features and the correct output, so that it can make accurate predictions on new, unseen data. In supervised learning, the model is trained on a set of data that contains both input features and correct outputs, and it adjusts its internal parameters to minimize the difference between its predicted outputs and the correct outputs. This process continues until the model can accurately predict the correct outputs for new, unseen data.

Understanding Supervised Learning

Definition of Supervised Learning

Supervised learning is a subfield of machine learning that involves the use of labeled data to train a model to make predictions or decisions on new, unseen data. The term "supervised" refers to the fact that the model is being trained by a human expert, who provides guidance and feedback to the model during the training process.

In supervised learning, the model is presented with a set of input-output pairs, where the input is a feature vector and the output is a label or target value. The model's goal is to learn a mapping from input features to output labels based on these pairs. This process is known as "learning from examples".

Supervised learning can be further divided into two main categories:

  • Regression: In which the output is a continuous value, such as predicting a person's weight based on their height.
  • Classification: In which the output is a discrete value, such as classifying an email as spam or not spam.

The accuracy of the model's predictions is evaluated using metrics such as mean squared error for regression tasks and classification accuracy for classification tasks. The goal of supervised learning is to build a model that generalizes well to new, unseen data, meaning that it can make accurate predictions on data that it has not seen before.

Key Elements of Supervised Learning

Description of the two main components: input features and target labels

Supervised learning is a type of machine learning where an algorithm learns from labeled data. The labeled data consists of two main components: input features and target labels. Input features are the independent variables in the data, and they represent the attributes or characteristics of the data that are being studied. These input features are used to make predictions about the target labels, which are the dependent variables in the data. Target labels are the outcome or response variable that the algorithm is trying to predict. They are the values that the algorithm is trying to learn from the input features.

Explanation of the relationship between input features and target labels

The relationship between input features and target labels is a key aspect of supervised learning. The algorithm learns from the labeled data by identifying patterns and relationships between the input features and target labels. The algorithm uses this learned relationship to make predictions about new, unseen data. For example, if the input features are the symptoms of a disease and the target label is the diagnosis, the algorithm learns the relationship between the symptoms and the diagnosis from the labeled data. Then, when given new data with symptoms, the algorithm can use the learned relationship to predict the diagnosis.

Importance of data preprocessing and feature engineering in supervised learning

Data preprocessing and feature engineering are critical steps in supervised learning. Data preprocessing involves cleaning and transforming the data to prepare it for analysis. This includes tasks such as removing missing values, scaling and normalizing the data, and encoding categorical variables. Feature engineering involves selecting and transforming the input features to improve the performance of the algorithm. This includes tasks such as creating new features, removing irrelevant features, and combining features to create more informative variables. The quality of the labeled data and the effectiveness of the data preprocessing and feature engineering steps can have a significant impact on the performance of the supervised learning algorithm.

How Supervised Learning Works

Key takeaway: Supervised learning is a subfield of machine learning that uses labeled data to train a model to make predictions or decisions on new, unseen data. It involves two main categories: regression and classification, and popular algorithms include logistic regression, decision trees, and support vector machines. Data preprocessing and feature engineering are critical steps in supervised learning, and regularization and cross-validation can be used to address overfitting and underfitting. Supervised learning is widely used in real-world applications such as image classification, natural language processing, and fraud detection.

The Training Phase

The training phase is a crucial aspect of supervised learning, where a model is trained on a labeled dataset to learn the relationship between input variables and their corresponding output variables. The training dataset plays a vital role in the development of the model, as it provides the necessary information for the model to learn from.

Overview of the training phase in supervised learning

The training phase involves the use of algorithms and optimization techniques to train the model on the labeled dataset. The goal of the training phase is to minimize the error between the predicted output and the actual output. This is achieved by iteratively adjusting the model's parameters to improve its accuracy.

Description of the training dataset and its role in model development

The training dataset is a collection of input-output pairs that are used to train the model. The quality and quantity of the training dataset are critical factors in the development of an accurate model. A well-designed training dataset should have a sufficient number of examples to capture the underlying patterns in the data.

The training dataset is used to measure the performance of the model and to adjust the model's parameters during the training process. The training dataset provides the model with the necessary information to learn the relationship between the input variables and the output variables.

Explanation of the training process, including the use of algorithms and optimization techniques

The training process involves the use of algorithms and optimization techniques to adjust the model's parameters to minimize the error between the predicted output and the actual output. The goal of the training process is to find the optimal values for the model's parameters that result in the lowest error.

There are various algorithms and optimization techniques that can be used in the training process, such as gradient descent, stochastic gradient descent, and conjugate gradient. These algorithms are used to iteratively adjust the model's parameters to minimize the error between the predicted output and the actual output.

The training process is an iterative process that continues until the model's performance on the training dataset reaches a satisfactory level. The model's performance on the training dataset is evaluated using metrics such as accuracy, precision, recall, and F1 score.

The Prediction Phase

The prediction phase is a crucial component of supervised learning, which involves using a trained model to make predictions on new, unseen data. In this phase, the model is employed to classify or predict the output variable based on the input features.

The prediction phase commences after the model has been trained using a labeled dataset. During training, the model learns the patterns and relationships between the input features and the output variable. Once the model has been trained, it can be used to make predictions on new data that was not used during training.

It is essential to evaluate the performance of the model during the prediction phase. Performance metrics such as accuracy, precision, recall, and F1 score are commonly used to assess the model's performance. These metrics provide insights into the model's ability to correctly classify or predict the output variable.

Additionally, it is important to ensure that the model is generalizing well to new data. Overfitting, where the model performs well on the training data but poorly on new data, can occur if the model is too complex or if there is not enough regularization. Techniques such as cross-validation and early stopping can be employed to prevent overfitting and improve the model's generalization ability.

In summary, the prediction phase is a critical step in supervised learning, where the trained model is used to make predictions on new data. Model evaluation and performance metrics are essential to assess the model's performance and ensure that it is generalizing well to new data.

Types of Supervised Learning Algorithms

Classification Algorithms

Classification algorithms are a type of supervised learning algorithm that is used to predict the class or category of a given input. These algorithms learn from labeled data, which means that the input data is accompanied by a corresponding output or label that indicates the class or category to which the input belongs.

There are two main types of classification algorithms: binary classification and multi-class classification. Binary classification algorithms are used when there are only two possible classes or categories, while multi-class classification algorithms are used when there are more than two classes or categories.

Some popular classification algorithms include logistic regression, decision trees, and support vector machines.

Binary Classification Algorithms

Binary classification algorithms are used when there are only two possible classes or categories. Examples of binary classification problems include spam detection and sentiment analysis.

One popular binary classification algorithm is logistic regression. Logistic regression is a type of regression analysis that is used to predict the probability of a binary outcome. It works by fitting a logistic function to the data, which is then used to make predictions.

Another popular binary classification algorithm is the decision tree. A decision tree is a type of algorithm that works by creating a tree-like model of decisions and their possible consequences. It works by recursively splitting the data into subsets based on the values of the input features, until a stopping criterion is reached.

Multi-Class Classification Algorithms

Multi-class classification algorithms are used when there are more than two classes or categories. Examples of multi-class classification problems include image classification and natural language processing.

One popular multi-class classification algorithm is the support vector machine (SVM). SVMs work by finding the hyperplane that best separates the different classes in the input space. They are particularly effective at handling high-dimensional data and can be used for both binary and multi-class classification problems.

Another popular multi-class classification algorithm is the k-nearest neighbors (KNN) algorithm. KNN works by finding the k closest training examples to a given input and using their labels to predict the label of the input. It is a simple and effective algorithm, but can be computationally expensive for large datasets.

Regression Algorithms

Introduction to Regression Algorithms in Supervised Learning

Regression algorithms are a class of supervised learning algorithms used for predicting a continuous output variable. They are commonly used in predictive modeling and data analysis to make predictions based on input variables. In contrast to classification algorithms, which predict discrete output variables, regression algorithms predict a continuous output variable.

Explanation of the Difference between Classification and Regression

Classification algorithms are used to predict discrete output variables, such as a binary label (e.g., 0 or 1) or a categorical label (e.g., red, green, or blue). Regression algorithms, on the other hand, are used to predict a continuous output variable, such as a numerical value. For example, regression algorithms can be used to predict a person's age based on their height and weight.

Discussion of Linear Regression, Polynomial Regression, and Other Regression Algorithms

Linear regression is a type of regression algorithm that uses a linear function to model the relationship between the input variables and the output variable. It is commonly used when the relationship between the input variables and the output variable is linear.

Polynomial regression is a type of regression algorithm that uses a polynomial function to model the relationship between the input variables and the output variable. It is commonly used when the relationship between the input variables and the output variable is nonlinear.

Other types of regression algorithms include logistic regression, decision tree regression, and neural network regression. These algorithms are used for different types of regression problems and can be more complex than linear and polynomial regression algorithms.

Overall, regression algorithms are an important class of supervised learning algorithms used for predicting continuous output variables. They are commonly used in predictive modeling and data analysis to make predictions based on input variables.

Ensemble Methods

Ensemble methods in supervised learning are a type of machine learning technique that combines multiple models to make predictions. The idea behind ensemble methods is to use the strengths of each individual model to improve the overall accuracy of the prediction. This is done by combining the predictions of multiple models and using a consensus-based approach to arrive at a final prediction.

One of the most popular ensemble methods is the random forest algorithm. In this method, multiple decision trees are trained on different subsets of the data, and the final prediction is made by averaging the predictions of all the decision trees. Another popular ensemble method is gradient boosting, which involves training multiple weak models sequentially, and the final prediction is made by combining the predictions of all the weak models.

Ensemble methods have been shown to be highly effective in a wide range of applications, including image classification, natural language processing, and fraud detection. The success of ensemble methods can be attributed to their ability to handle complex and noisy data, and their ability to generalize well to new data.

Challenges and Considerations in Supervised Learning

Overfitting and Underfitting

Overfitting and underfitting are two common challenges in supervised learning. Overfitting occurs when a model becomes too complex and fits the training data too closely, resulting in poor generalization to new data. Underfitting occurs when a model is too simple and cannot capture the underlying patterns in the data, resulting in poor performance on both the training and test data.

Model complexity plays a crucial role in determining the risk of overfitting. A model with too many parameters or a complex architecture may overfit the training data, while a model with too few parameters may underfit. To address overfitting, techniques such as regularization and early stopping can be used to prevent the model from becoming too complex.

Regularization adds a penalty term to the loss function to discourage the model from using complex weights. This helps to prevent overfitting by reducing the model's capacity to fit the noise in the training data. Common regularization techniques include L1 and L2 regularization.

Cross-validation is another technique used to address overfitting. It involves splitting the data into multiple folds and training the model on each fold while testing it on the remaining folds. This allows the model to be evaluated on unseen data and helps to prevent overfitting by providing a more robust estimate of its performance.

In summary, overfitting and underfitting are important considerations in supervised learning. Techniques such as regularization and cross-validation can be used to address these challenges and improve the generalization performance of the model.

Bias-Variance Tradeoff

The bias-variance tradeoff is a crucial challenge in supervised learning, which involves striking a balance between the model's ability to fit the training data and its ability to generalize to new, unseen data. In this context, bias refers to the error introduced by making assumptions or simplifications in the model, while variance refers to the error caused by the model's sensitivity to small fluctuations in the training data.

The bias-variance tradeoff is critical because a model with high bias will perform poorly on new data, as it will not accurately capture the underlying patterns in the data. On the other hand, a model with high variance will overfit the training data, meaning it will perform well on the training data but poorly on new data. Overfitting occurs when the model is too complex and captures noise in the training data, rather than the underlying patterns.

To address the bias-variance tradeoff, several techniques can be employed:

  • Underfitting: A model with low bias and high variance is said to be underfitting the data. To address this, the model can be simplified or made more complex, depending on the nature of the problem.
  • Regularization: Regularization techniques, such as L1 and L2 regularization, can be used to reduce the complexity of the model and mitigate overfitting. These techniques introduce a penalty term in the loss function to discourage large weights in the model.
  • Cross-validation: Cross-validation is a technique used to evaluate the performance of the model on different subsets of the data. It can help identify overfitting and guide the selection of the best model hyperparameters.
  • Early stopping: Early stopping is a technique used to prevent overfitting by monitoring the validation loss during training and stopping the training process when the validation loss starts to increase.

In summary, the bias-variance tradeoff is a critical challenge in supervised learning that requires striking a balance between the model's ability to fit the training data and its ability to generalize to new data. Techniques such as regularization, cross-validation, and early stopping can be employed to address this challenge and improve the model's performance.

Data Quality and Quantity

Supervised learning, a subfield of machine learning, relies heavily on high-quality and sufficient training data to make accurate predictions. However, obtaining and maintaining a robust dataset can be challenging, especially when dealing with real-world applications. This section will discuss the importance of data quality and quantity in supervised learning, the common challenges related to these aspects, and methods to address data limitations.

Importance of High-Quality and Sufficient Training Data

High-quality and sufficient training data are essential for supervised learning models to achieve high accuracy and generalization performance. The training data is used to learn the mapping function between input features and output labels, and a poor-quality dataset can lead to biased, inaccurate, or overfitting models. On the other hand, insufficient data can result in underfitting, where the model cannot capture the underlying patterns in the data, leading to poor performance.

Common Challenges Related to Data Quality and Quantity

Real-world datasets often come with various challenges, including:

  1. Data imbalance: In many real-world applications, the number of samples for each class can be significantly imbalanced, leading to bias in the model's predictions. For example, in a fraud detection system, it might be more common to have legitimate transactions than fraudulent ones, making it challenging for the model to accurately predict fraud.
  2. Noise and outliers: Real-world data can be noisy, with measurement errors or outliers that can negatively impact the performance of the model. For instance, in a healthcare dataset, a patient's measurement might be incorrect due to a faulty sensor or human error, which can affect the model's ability to make accurate predictions.
  3. Incomplete or missing data: Real-world datasets can often be incomplete or have missing values, making it challenging for the model to learn from the available data. For example, in a customer service chatbot application, a conversation might be incomplete if a customer disconnects before the conversation is finished, leading to missing data.
  4. Data privacy and ethical concerns: Real-world datasets often contain sensitive information that must be protected. This can make it challenging to use the data for training and testing models without compromising privacy. For instance, in a healthcare application, patient data must be kept confidential to protect their privacy.

Data Augmentation and Other Methods to Address Data Limitations

To address data limitations, several techniques can be employed:

  1. Data augmentation: This technique involves generating additional training data by applying transformations to the existing data. For example, in an image classification task, data augmentation might involve flipping, rotating, or changing the brightness of the images. This can help increase the size and diversity of the dataset, improving the model's performance.
  2. Transfer learning: This technique involves using a pre-trained model as a starting point and fine-tuning it on the new dataset. This can be useful when the new dataset is small or has limited diversity. By leveraging the knowledge learned from a larger and more diverse dataset, the model can achieve better performance on the new dataset.
  3. Data preprocessing: This involves cleaning and transforming the data to make it more suitable for training. This can include handling missing values, normalizing the data, or removing noise. Proper data preprocessing can improve the model's performance by making the data more consistent and relevant.
  4. Active learning: This technique involves selecting a subset of the most informative samples from the dataset to be labeled by humans. By focusing on the most uncertain or difficult samples, the model can learn more effectively from the labeled data, improving its performance.

In summary, high-quality and sufficient training data are crucial for the success of supervised learning models. However, real-world datasets often come with challenges related to data quality and quantity. By employing techniques such as data augmentation, transfer learning, data preprocessing, and active learning, practitioners can address these limitations and build more accurate and robust models.

Real-World Applications of Supervised Learning

Image Classification

Supervised learning is widely used in image classification tasks, which involve identifying and classifying objects within images. This type of classification is essential in many real-world applications, including object recognition and medical imaging.

Object Recognition

Object recognition is a common application of image classification in the field of computer vision. It involves using machine learning algorithms to identify and classify objects within images. For example, a system may be trained to recognize and classify different types of vehicles in images or videos.

In object recognition, supervised learning algorithms are trained on a large dataset of labeled images. The labeled images consist of objects of interest, such as vehicles, and their corresponding labels, which indicate the type of vehicle in the image. The algorithm then learns to recognize and classify similar objects in new images.

Medical Imaging

Supervised learning is also used in medical imaging to classify and diagnose medical conditions. For example, medical images, such as X-rays or MRIs, can be analyzed using supervised learning algorithms to identify and classify different types of medical conditions.

In medical imaging, the dataset used for training the supervised learning algorithm consists of labeled medical images and their corresponding diagnoses. The algorithm then learns to recognize and diagnose similar medical conditions in new images.

Overall, image classification is a critical application of supervised learning in real-world scenarios. It enables machines to identify and classify objects within images, making it possible to automate many tasks and improve the accuracy and efficiency of processes in various industries.

Natural Language Processing

Natural Language Processing (NLP) is a subfield of Artificial Intelligence (AI) that focuses on the interaction between computers and human language. It involves the use of computational techniques to analyze, understand, and generate human language. Supervised learning is extensively used in NLP tasks, as it enables machines to learn from labeled data.

Text Classification

Text classification is a common NLP task that involves categorizing text into predefined categories. It is used in various applications, such as spam filtering, sentiment analysis, and topic classification. In text classification, supervised learning algorithms are trained on labeled data, where the input is a text document, and the output is a predefined category. The algorithm learns to identify patterns in the text that are associated with each category.

Sentiment Analysis

Sentiment analysis is another popular NLP task that involves determining the sentiment or emotion expressed in a text. It is used in applications such as customer feedback analysis, social media monitoring, and product reviews analysis. In sentiment analysis, supervised learning algorithms are trained on labeled data, where the input is a text document, and the output is a sentiment score indicating the level of positive or negative sentiment.

Language Translation

Language translation is the process of converting text from one language to another. It is a challenging task that requires a deep understanding of language structure and context. Supervised learning algorithms are used in language translation tasks, where the input is a sentence in one language, and the output is a translated sentence in another language. The algorithm learns to identify patterns in the input sentence that correspond to specific words or phrases in the target language.

Overall, supervised learning plays a crucial role in natural language processing tasks, enabling machines to learn from labeled data and improve their performance over time.

Fraud Detection

Supervised learning algorithms have proven to be invaluable in the detection of fraudulent activities. One of the most significant applications of supervised learning in the financial industry is in fraud detection systems. These systems use machine learning algorithms to identify patterns of fraudulent activity in financial transactions.

In fraud detection, supervised learning algorithms are trained on a dataset of historical transactions that have been labeled as either fraudulent or non-fraudulent. The algorithm then uses this training data to learn to identify patterns of behavior that are indicative of fraud. These patterns can include unusual transaction amounts, unexpected transaction times, or patterns of transactions that are inconsistent with the normal behavior of the account holder.

Once the algorithm has been trained, it can be used to analyze new transactions in real-time. The algorithm will then classify each transaction as either fraudulent or non-fraudulent based on the patterns it has learned to identify. This allows financial institutions to detect fraudulent activity in real-time, which can help to prevent significant financial losses.

Supervised learning algorithms are particularly effective in fraud detection because they can adapt to new patterns of fraudulent activity. As fraudsters develop new tactics to evade detection, the algorithm can be retrained on new data to learn to identify these new patterns. This makes supervised learning algorithms a powerful tool for financial institutions looking to stay ahead of fraudsters and protect their customers' financial information.

Recap of Supervised Learning

Supervised learning is a type of machine learning algorithm that involves training a model to predict an output based on input data. The model is trained on a labeled dataset, which consists of input-output pairs. The algorithm learns to generalize from the training data and make predictions on new, unseen data.

In supervised learning, the goal is to learn a mapping function between input variables and output variables. The model learns to associate input features with the corresponding output labels. This is done by minimizing the difference between the predicted output and the actual output.

Supervised learning is widely used in various applications such as image classification, speech recognition, natural language processing, and recommendation systems.

The key components of supervised learning include the input data, output data, and the model. The input data consists of the features that are used to make predictions. The output data consists of the labels or target values that the model is trying to predict. The model is the function that maps the input data to the output data.

Understanding supervised learning is important in the broader context of machine learning because it is one of the most widely used algorithms. It has applications in a variety of fields and has been successful in solving complex problems. By understanding the basic concepts and components of supervised learning, one can gain a deeper understanding of machine learning and its potential applications.

Potential Future Developments

As the field of artificial intelligence continues to evolve, so too does the potential for supervised learning to be applied in a wide range of real-world scenarios. In this section, we will explore some of the emerging trends and potential advancements in supervised learning that are currently being researched and developed.

Personalized Medicine

One area where supervised learning is being explored is in the field of personalized medicine. By analyzing patient data, such as medical history, genetic markers, and lifestyle factors, supervised learning algorithms can help doctors develop personalized treatment plans that are tailored to each individual's unique needs. This can lead to more effective and efficient treatments, as well as a reduction in side effects and drug interactions.

Autonomous Vehicles

Another promising application of supervised learning is in the development of autonomous vehicles. By using supervised learning algorithms to analyze data from sensors and cameras, self-driving cars can learn to navigate complex environments and make real-time decisions based on changing conditions. This technology has the potential to revolutionize transportation and improve safety on the roads.

Fraud Detection

Supervised learning is also being used to detect fraud in a variety of industries, including finance, insurance, and healthcare. By analyzing patterns in data, supervised learning algorithms can identify potential fraudulent activity and alert authorities before it causes significant damage. This can help prevent financial losses and protect consumers from harm.

Natural Language Processing

Finally, supervised learning is being used to improve natural language processing (NLP) technology. By analyzing large datasets of text, supervised learning algorithms can help machines learn to understand and generate human language. This has a wide range of potential applications, including improved customer service, more effective communication between humans and machines, and better language translation services.

Overall, the potential future developments in supervised learning are vast and varied, and the technology is poised to have a significant impact on a wide range of industries and fields. As research continues and new applications are discovered, it is likely that supervised learning will become an even more integral part of our daily lives.

Final Thoughts

In conclusion, supervised learning has proven to be a powerful and versatile approach to machine learning, with a wide range of real-world applications across various industries. Its ability to learn from labeled data and make predictions or classifications has made it a valuable tool for tasks such as image and speech recognition, natural language processing, and recommendation systems.

Furthermore, the flexibility of supervised learning algorithms, such as SVMs and neural networks, allows them to be tailored to specific tasks and adapt to changing data distributions. This makes them a popular choice for data-driven decision-making in fields such as finance, healthcare, and marketing.

As the field of AI and machine learning continues to evolve, it is important to stay up-to-date with the latest advancements and best practices in supervised learning. By continuing to explore and learn about this field, practitioners can unlock its full potential and make significant contributions to the development of intelligent systems.

In summary, supervised learning is a critical component of the AI and machine learning landscape, with a wide range of real-world applications and endless potential for further exploration and development.

FAQs

1. What is supervised learning?

Supervised learning is a type of machine learning where an algorithm learns from labeled data. In other words, the algorithm is trained on a dataset that contains both input data and the corresponding output or target data. The goal of supervised learning is to learn a mapping function that can accurately predict the output for new, unseen input data.

2. What are the different types of supervised learning?

There are two main types of supervised learning: classification and regression. Classification is used when the output is a categorical variable, such as predicting the class of an object (e.g., whether an email is spam or not). Regression, on the other hand, is used when the output is a continuous variable, such as predicting the price of a house based on its features.

3. What is the difference between supervised and unsupervised learning?

In supervised learning, the algorithm is trained on labeled data, meaning that the input-output pairs are provided. In contrast, in unsupervised learning, the algorithm is trained on unlabeled data and must find patterns or relationships in the data on its own. The goal of unsupervised learning is to discover hidden structures in the data, such as clusters or anomalies.

4. What are some common applications of supervised learning?

Supervised learning has many applications in various fields, including healthcare (e.g., predicting patient outcomes), finance (e.g., detecting fraud), and natural language processing (e.g., sentiment analysis). Some other examples include image classification (e.g., identifying objects in images), speech recognition (e.g., recognizing spoken words), and recommendation systems (e.g., suggesting products based on user preferences).

5. What are some challenges in supervised learning?

One major challenge in supervised learning is dealing with imbalanced datasets, where the number of samples for each class is not balanced. Another challenge is dealing with noisy data, where incorrect or irrelevant data points can negatively impact the model's performance. Additionally, overfitting, where the model becomes too complex and performs well on the training data but poorly on new data, is a common issue in supervised learning.

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